Tag Archives: feature

White Light – Panel #7

“The carriage begins to pick up speed. I want to lean forward and ask Roman if he’s okay, but when I look out again, I see, for the first time, people in the windows of a villa. They are staring expectantly up at the now pitch-black sky. The speed of the horses alarms their dogs […]

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Hot Summer of 1968 | Review

“Then there is a veritable panorama of the immediate post-’68 emigration process itself: from the border crossings that, again, resemble neither the dangerous escapes of previous eras nor those that would follow when the regime would seal the border. There are nervous train rides; nostalgic car rides; last looks; and sad goodbyes. There is Vienna, […]

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A Kind Of Black Magic: An Interview With Marek Šindelka

Recently, I spoke with Czech writer Marek Šindelka about his novels Aberrant and Material Fatigue, his graphic novel Sv. Barbora, going from being a poet to a prose writer and a number of other issues. You can read the full article in Apofenie magazine here. To get a copy of Aberrant from Twisted Spoon Press […]

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Andrey Filimonov in B O D Y: fiction/interview

In the opening week of B O D Y’s Spring Issue we hit you with a double dose of Russian writer Andrey Filimonov. First, there’s an exclusive excerpt of the translation from his novel Retsepty sotvoreniya mira (World Creation Recipes), a book that delves into Russia and the writer’s family’s convoluted 20th century with some hallucinogenic […]

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Witches Sabbath | Review

Witches Sabbath By Maurice Sachs Translated from the French by Richard Howard 2020, Spurl Editions, 276 pp. Maurice Sachs was born in Paris in 1906, when the Belle Époque was giving way to modernity, and grew up nourished by that golden age of French culture in a way that seems unimaginable today. His grandfather was […]

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The Flight of Icarus – in Phantom Drift

“How far do you have to go to be free of the threat of imprisonment? Up in the air, the idea of confinement suddenly became nonsensical. There were no walls, nothing solid to keep you still. On the earth though, there were borders and barracks and armed guards…” From my short story “The Flight of […]

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Literary roundup: WWB’s Young Russophonia + Rankov interview

Books From Slovakia has a fantastic interview Daniela Balážová held with Slovak writer Pavol Rankov, author of the recently translated It Happened on the First of September. Among many topics Rankov talks about how the different translations deal with all the different languages used in the novel (spoiler: differently) and also talks about the lost multicultural […]

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Death of the Artists: Marinetti’s Last Stand

Marinetti was both the Malcolm McLaren and Johnny Rotten of his era, the impresario and figurehead of what was early 20th century punk. He charmed his audience with shock and provocation, telling his Russian hosts that the Kremlin was an absurdity, Tolstoy hypocritical, Dostoevsky hysterical, responded to a question about Russian art by asking if […]

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Rankov in B O D Y: Winter Issue

After they finished the rosary, their mother made her usual plea: “Dear God, please bring Karcsi home safely from the war.” “Amen,” Péter and his father said. “No,” Karcsi said, “I don’t want to come home. Instead you should pray that I live a less depraved life in hell than I have in this world.” […]

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Pavol Rankov review in Versopolis

“The way Rankov balances and weaves together the seemingly lighter side of the September 1st story with its darker and more momentous occasions, such as the September 1st, 1939 outbreak of World War II, makes for a highly compelling narrative. By slipping back and forth from fascism to youthful frivolity, the darkness is made darker […]

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