Tag Archives: feature

The Flight of Icarus

“How far do you have to go to be free of the threat of imprisonment? Up in the air, the idea of confinement suddenly became nonsensical. There were no walls, nothing solid to keep you still. On the earth though, there were borders and barracks and armed guards…” From my short story “The Flight of […]

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Literary roundup: WWB’s Young Russophonia + Rankov interview

Books From Slovakia has a fantastic interview Daniela Balážová held with Slovak writer Pavol Rankov, author of the recently translated It Happened on the First of September. Among many topics Rankov talks about how the different translations deal with all the different languages used in the novel (spoiler: differently) and also talks about the lost multicultural […]

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Death of the Artists: Marinetti’s Last Stand

Marinetti was both the Malcolm McLaren and Johnny Rotten of his era, the impresario and figurehead of what was early 20th century punk. He charmed his audience with shock and provocation, telling his Russian hosts that the Kremlin was an absurdity, Tolstoy hypocritical, Dostoevsky hysterical, responded to a question about Russian art by asking if […]

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Rankov in B O D Y: Winter Issue

After they finished the rosary, their mother made her usual plea: “Dear God, please bring Karcsi home safely from the war.” “Amen,” Péter and his father said. “No,” Karcsi said, “I don’t want to come home. Instead you should pray that I live a less depraved life in hell than I have in this world.” […]

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Pavol Rankov review in Versopolis

“The way Rankov balances and weaves together the seemingly lighter side of the September 1st story with its darker and more momentous occasions, such as the September 1st, 1939 outbreak of World War II, makes for a highly compelling narrative. By slipping back and forth from fascism to youthful frivolity, the darkness is made darker […]

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Milan Kundera wins Kafka Prize

The Franz Kafka Society has announced that the winner of this year’s award is Milan Kundera. The 91 year-old writer responded to the announcement from Paris by phone, saying he was particularly honored to receive the Kafka Prize. The Kafka Prize has a long list of prestigious previous winners, including a brief run where it […]

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Julia Lukshina in B O D Y

“As evening drew on, I tore myself away from my desk, went out into the field, and wandered this way and that, this way and that, until at some point I found myself dancing. At first it was awful: I kept stopping and looking around. But then awareness yielded to motion. I was scooping up […]

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Lit_cast Slovakia #8: Michael Stein

The most recent episode of Julia Sherwood’s excellent podcast series on Slovak literature in English is me. I talk about the pros and cons of a virus-emptied center of Prague, the Central European literary sensibility and why I like it and especially about some of the Slovak writers I’ve read, written about and published in […]

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Ruritania Prize 2020

Budapest-based Panel Magazine is holding a contest for original short fiction from Central and Eastern Europe. The 2020 Ruritania Prize, named after Anthony Hope’s imaginary Eastern European kingdom of in The Prisoner of Zenda, is accepting short fiction between 1,000 and 4,000 words by July 31. To qualify you have to live or have lived […]

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Jan Balaban review in B O D Y

In commemoration of the death of Czech writer Jan Balabán ten years ago at the age of forty-nine, B O D Y editor Jan Zikmund has reviewed the English version of Balabán’s short story collection Maybe We’re Leaving, translated from the Czech by Charles S. Kraszewski. He writes about how Balabán writes “quiet”, compact stories […]

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