Tag Archives: Russian writers

End of the World Diary, Pt. III – Natalia Klyuchareva

Translated from the Russian by Mariya Gusev #end_of_the_world_diary I teach at a literary seminar. A colleague wrote that a student had just given her a story where a rocket hits a TV tower. And a student gave me a story where two people were fleeing a nuclear explosion that had engulfed Moscow. I envy those […]

Continue Reading

One Day All This Will End

Translated from the Russian by Mariya Gusev and Rebecca Bella Wangh One day, all this will endFor sure, it will run its course —Bombs and buckwheat will run outTanks and matches will run outCannon fodder will run outCheese in the mousetrap will run outAir in a space suit will run outTime and money will run […]

Continue Reading

End of the World Diary, Pt. II – Natalia Klyuchareva

Translated from the Russian by Mariya Gusev #end_of_the_world_diary I read the news that Putin put nuclear weapons on high alert, decided to enjoy life for the last time, went to a coffee shop, drank a mango sea buckthorn smoothie. It was very tasty. At a nearby table, two blondes with oversized lips are arguing with […]

Continue Reading

End of the World Diary, Pt. I – Natalia Klyuchareva

Translated from the Russian by Mariya Gusev Throughout this week, which will close out the first month of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, Literalab will publish the writing of Natalia Klyuchareva. “The End of the World Diary” recounts her reactions during the war’s opening week. “March 6” tells about her experience attending an anti-war rally. […]

Continue Reading

Russian voices of dissent

As the Russian invasion of Ukraine continues along with the war of information accompanying it there has been a tendency to turn away from anything Russian as a gesture of solidarity with Ukraine. What this leaves out are Russian voices of dissent, voices that speak out despite the growing and significant risks involved. Among those […]

Continue Reading

Literary Roundup: Nelly Sachs, EUPL Prize and Sorokin on Putin

The nominees for the 2022 European Union Prize for Literature have been announced. The award is changing this year, with the jury choosing a single overall winner rather than one from each country. There are 14 nominees this year ranging from Ukraine and Georgia to Ireland and Spain. Among the selected writers is Slovakia’s Richard […]

Continue Reading

Andrey Filimonov in B O D Y: fiction/interview

In the opening week of B O D Y’s Spring Issue we hit you with a double dose of Russian writer Andrey Filimonov. First, there’s an exclusive excerpt of the translation from his novel Retsepty sotvoreniya mira (World Creation Recipes), a book that delves into Russia and the writer’s family’s convoluted 20th century with some hallucinogenic […]

Continue Reading

B O D Y: The Spring Issue

The Spring Issue of B O D Y kicks off today with some poetry. I’ll have some fiction from Russia by Andrey Filimonov translated by Richard Coombes and Anne O. Fisher followed by a discussion the two translators had with Filimonov about his work, his influences, growing up in Siberia, Slavic word games and where […]

Continue Reading

Literary roundup: WWB’s Young Russophonia + Rankov interview

Books From Slovakia has a fantastic interview Daniela Balážová held with Slovak writer Pavol Rankov, author of the recently translated It Happened on the First of September. Among many topics Rankov talks about how the different translations deal with all the different languages used in the novel (spoiler: differently) and also talks about the lost multicultural […]

Continue Reading

Julia Lukshina in B O D Y

“As evening drew on, I tore myself away from my desk, went out into the field, and wandered this way and that, this way and that, until at some point I found myself dancing. At first it was awful: I kept stopping and looking around. But then awareness yielded to motion. I was scooping up […]

Continue Reading