Tag Archives: subfeature

Deceit | Review

“This isn’t the placelessness of a fellow modernist writer like Kafka, but more closely resembles that of a hyperrealistic painting, where the attention to detail – the glint of light on a bottle, the folds of skin on the figure’s neck – obscure any sign of the surroundings. Felsen isn’t looking at the world through […]

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Prague Microfestival XIV

The 14th Prague Microfestival takes place next weekend. Billed as a festival of ‘International Writing, Art, Film, Theory and Performance’ it will take place at Punctum, Krásova 27 in Žižkov. Among the writers and performers I will be reading on Saturday, October 15 at 6:30 pm, together with a number of other writers. You can […]

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The Continental: Noir

The latest issue of The Continental, a magazine I am editing and writing for, is out. The theme of the issue is Noir and includes work from a darker, crime-ridden era of New York City (otherwise known as the good ‘ol days) to a futurist Hungary, Russia, the Czech Republic and elsewhere. Founder of Punk […]

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Bianca Bellová in B O D Y

“And this handsome but utterly stupid young man, who had never had to deny himself an eighth dumpling in his life and was playing at being a committed left-winger, even taking the liberty of professing a kind of ideological solidarity with her, he wasn’t even capable of finding out the most basic information about her […]

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Karel Šebek in B O D Y

I write to keep the train on course to crush meit’ll happen on a morning no less beautiful than thishands latticed in love like jailbars shall adorn every windowI am seeking death her silver in every living momentwords piled like cadaversa death camp of happiness – from an untitled poem by Karel Šebek, translated from […]

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Visegrad: A Novel; The Prague Reading

On May 4, Duncan Robertson will be appearing at Shakespeare and Sons bookstore and cafe to read from his newly published novel Visegrad. I will be hosting the event – in the sense that I’ll introduce and do a Q&A with Duncan, not that I live in a bookstore. Visegrad is the picaresque journey of […]

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End of the World Diary, Pt. II – Natalia Klyuchareva

Translated from the Russian by Mariya Gusev #end_of_the_world_diary I read the news that Putin put nuclear weapons on high alert, decided to enjoy life for the last time, went to a coffee shop, drank a mango sea buckthorn smoothie. It was very tasty. At a nearby table, two blondes with oversized lips are arguing with […]

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End of the World Diary, Pt. I – Natalia Klyuchareva

Translated from the Russian by Mariya Gusev Throughout this week, which will close out the first month of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, Literalab will publish the writing of Natalia Klyuchareva. “The End of the World Diary” recounts her reactions during the war’s opening week. “March 6” tells about her experience attending an anti-war rally. […]

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Literary Roundup: Nelly Sachs, EUPL Prize and Sorokin on Putin

The nominees for the 2022 European Union Prize for Literature have been announced. The award is changing this year, with the jury choosing a single overall winner rather than one from each country. There are 14 nominees this year ranging from Ukraine and Georgia to Ireland and Spain. Among the selected writers is Slovakia’s Richard […]

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Duncan Robertson in B O D Y

“One of those things most difficult to convey about the special conditions in which we lived was the visegradišag: that everything, buying bread, recycling, riding the tram, came with a surreal associated cost that was impossible to anticipate and could range in consequence from mild discomfort to soul-shattering alienation, forcing you to withdraw from the […]

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