Tag Archives: Jan Balabán

B O D Y’s Czech issue

November at B O D Y has been full of contemporary Czech writing brought to you by guest editor Jan Zikmund. It’s impossible to mention everyone here but there’s been poetry by Jiří Kolář, Ivan Wernisch, Tereza Riedlbauchová, Pavel Šrut and Olga Pek among many others. There were short stories by Jan Balabán and Magdaléna […]

Continue Reading

Jan Balaban in B O D Y

The first week of B O D Y’s month-long Czech issue was finished off with a powerful short story, “Cedar and Hammer”, by the award winning writer Jan Balabán, whose literary output is all the more impressive considering he died at the age of 49. There is next to nothing of Balabán’s work available in […]

Continue Reading

WWB: Contemporary Czech Prose

The latest issue of Words Without Borders is out and is devoted to Contemporary Czech prose. Edited and with an introductory essay by translator Alex Zucker, the issue includes writers who are likely little to totally unknown even to readers keeping up with contemporary European fiction. In his essay Zucker pushes at the political straitjacket […]

Continue Reading

Martin Ryšavý wins Škvorecký Prize for Czech literature

An article in Czech Position on the 2011 Josef Škvorecký Prize going to Czech novelist, screenwriter and documentary filmmaker Martin Ryšavý for his novel Vrač. Continue Reading

Continue Reading

An exciting time for Czech literature

Czech writers such as Milan Kundera, Bohumil Hrabal and Josef Škvorecký were an imposing presence in world literature in the last few decades of the 20th century. Today, a new generations of Czech novelists is beginning to make its mark. Coming off a recent appearance at the International Literature Festival Berlin, novelist Tomáš Zmeškal spoke […]

Continue Reading

Jan Balabán – writer on fire

“You’re asking whether there can be an innocent painting? What kind of a question is that? Innocent – how?” Hans glanced at the pictures around him. “A painting that would bear a direct relationship to reality, simply and openly, without any gimmicks, irony or hyperbole, or any other twisted perspectives,” Michal, the painter, developed his […]

Continue Reading