Tag Archives: Miklós Szentkuthy

New and Novel

The 20th century’s darker chapters loom large in this week’s newly published books, with a story of romance set during the Auschwitz trials, a story of trickery and imagination written by one of the victims of Stalin’s Terror from Georgia, and the long-awaited translation of one of Hungary’s legendary works of modernism.     This […]

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Miklos Szentkuthy in B O D Y

With the publication of the first volume of Hungarian writer Miklós Szentkuthy’s Prae coming up in December 2014 by Contra Mundum Press you can read an excerpt from the work that publisher Rainer Hanshe writes in an essay had Szentkuthy called a “monster” upon its initial publication in 1934 and which “essentially inaugurated the Hungarian […]

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Literary roundup: The Szentkuthy renaissance and Odessan letters

At Hungarian Literature Online (HLO) there is a very thorough summary of the efforts by translator Tim Wilkinson and Contra Mundum Press to bring Hungarian writer Miklós Szentkuthy (1908–1988) into the international prominence many feel he deserves. The latest Szentkuthy work published in English is his Marginalia on Casanova, with Towards the One & Only […]

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Asymptote April 2013: Russian poetry, Miklós Szentkuthy and more

Asymptote’s April 2013 issue has just come out and, as always, contains a lot of great prose, poetry and more, some of which comes from the part of the world written about hereabouts. The introduction of Hungarian writer Miklós Szentkuthy continues with an excerpt from Towards the One and Only Metaphor translated by Tim Wilkinson […]

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Literary roundup: Miklós Szentkuthy, Casanova and long Hungarian sentences

Hungarian Literature Online has published the introduction to Miklós Szentkuthy’s Marginalia on Casanova, which is being published in an English translation by Tim Wilkinson by the Contra Mundum Press in September. Szentkuthy’s obscurity in the English-speaking and reading world makes even some of Central Europe’s most obscure writers seems like the stars of their own […]

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