Tag Archives: Yuri Andrukhovych

Cartarescu’s ‘Blinding’ wins Leipzig Book Award

Romanian writer Mircea Cărtărescu has won the Leipzig Book Award for his trilogy Blinding. The novel originally came out in three separate parts in 1996, 2002 and 2007 respectively, while its outstanding English translation by Sean Cotter was published as a single book by Archipelago Books in 2013. The award’s full name is the “Leipzig […]

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Leipzig Book Fair 2014

The Leipzig Book Fair is underway as of yesterday, and as always there is a lot of eastward looking literary fare on the agenda, kicking off today with something about Euromaidan that has Yuri Andrukhovych, Andrei Kurkov and writer and singer Irina Karpa among the panel participants (I say “something about Euromaidan” because the program […]

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Literary roundup: Eastern promise and Balla

Natasha Perova, editor of Glas New Russian Writing, has a very interesting piece in PEN America on the Russian literary scene in which she discusses the young generation of writers (some of which Glas publishes due to their association with the Debut Prize) and what differentiates them from the writers of the Russian and Soviet […]

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Yuri Andrukhovych

Yuri Andrukhovych came to Prague’s Forum 2000 more as a journalist from a country very much in the center of debates about political liberties and freedom of the press than as the writer of the postmodern absurdist novel Perverzion. At the forum itself he discussed the situation of Ukraine and its beleaguered yet extremely resilient […]

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Forum 2000: Media and Democracy

In its 16th year in Prague Forum 2000 begins its first full day today after kicking off with an opening ceremony last night that included Joan Baez singing “We Shall Overcome” and will now follow up with discussion panels on the state of the media that may well disagree with Ms. Baez’s sentiments. We shall […]

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Bruno Schulz Festival

The 5th International Bruno Schulz Festival kicks off this week in his hometown of Drohobych, Ukraine (formerly Drohobycz, Poland). Called “The Ark of Bruno Schulz’s Imagination” the festival also has some sideline events in the regional capital of Lviv, including an exhibition of his paintings and graphic works opening September 4. Schulz first exhibited in […]

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Masters of the Borderland in Prague

You can never really say too much about Franz Kafka and Bruno Schulz. Not that there isn’t a lot of pure BS and cliché written about Kafka by people who don’t have a clue why he is considered such an important writer – in fact, maybe that’s one more reason why an exhibition putting Kafka […]

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Literary roundup: red cards for Eastern Europe

Where to look to discover new writers? At MFA programs, readings, literary magazines?  Wrong. Israeli daily Haaretz tells the remarkable story of parking attendant turned writer Leonid Pekarovsky (or Russian art critic and intellectual turned parking lot attendant turned writer). Having emigrated from Kiev to Israel, Pekarovsky discovered that his intellectual pursuits back home meant […]

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Yuri Andrukhovych on the cultural losers of the contemporary world

“But who would Joyce be if he wrote not in English but, say, in Albanian?” It is not only the existence of Central Europe that can be called into question apparently, but of Europe itself. “Perhaps Europe as a single entity actually does not exist after all,” begins a lecture presented at last month’s European […]

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On the non-existence of Central European literature

Central European literary life A recurring obstacle to writing about Central European literature is the fact that it apparently doesn’t exist. As recently as this year, when Penguin UK brought out its series of Central European Classics, British novelist Adam Thirlwell began his overview of the collection by writing “I can put it like this. […]

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