Tag Archives: OBERIU

Daniil Kharms in B O D Y

Two short pieces by Daniil Kharms from the mid-1930’s translated by Alexander Cigale, one about an invasive cuckoo bird among other things, the other miraculously seeming to foreshadow every hipster’s worst nightmare scenario. You can also go back to the last installment of Saturday European Fiction for more Kharms. Read more Saturday European Fiction

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Daniil Kharms in B O D Y

“And so, it once happened that Nikolay Ivanovich found himself in Hotel Europe, in their restaurant. Nikolay Ivanovich sits at his table, and the table over from him is occupied by some foreigners, and they’re gobbling up apples.   And that’s when Nikolay Ivanovich said to himself: ‘A curious thing,’ Nikolay Ivanovich said to himself, […]

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Literary roundup: An invitation for you to think – Vvedensky, Shishkin, Nabokov

On March 27, Read Russia and The New York Review of Books are co-hosting the book launch of the much awaited An Invitation for Me to Think by Alexander Vvedensky, translated by Eugene Ostashevsky, with additional translations by Matvei Yankelevich. All of these publishers, organizers and translators will be in attendance in NYC at Pravda […]

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Literary roundup: examining evil and Russian books 2013

Prague literary journal B O D Y has an unbelievable story from award-winning Czech writer Tomáš Zmeškal. “Vision of Hitler,” translated by Nathan Fields, is a story that is even more unnerving in keeping the reader guessing what kind of story it is than in its ultimate subject matter (though that’s unnerving too). What begins […]

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Literary roundup: The price of Russian avant-garde poetry and a Hebrew poet and photographer of Russian writers

Haaretz has a fascinating article on the rich but deeply conflicted life of the Hebrew poet and mostly St. Petersburg resident photographer Asher K. Shapiro. Having converted to Christianity on what he thought was his deathbed so he could marry his pregnant Orthodox Russian girlfriend Shapiro spent his life with the social benefits and personal […]

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Practical application of Russian literature

Yesterday I posted about an article defining the influence of Tolstoy’s novella The Death of Ivan Ilych on the psychological and medical approach to death. It turns out that the usefulness of Russian literature goes beyond the medical profession, as Thomas de Waal points out in an excellent article in Foreign Policy. With a tip […]

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