Literary Roundup: Stories from nowhere – Brazil+Ukraine to be exact

This evening in London, Brazilian author of the novel Nowhere People, Paulo Scott, will be appearing at the London Review Bookshop. Published by And Other Stories, the book was translated from the Portuguese by Daniel Hahn and is described on the event host’s site as presenting “the stark contrast between the world of the rich, young urban elite of São Paulo and that of the dispossessed Guarani Indians.” I just started reading it and it’s great so far.

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Teffi in Kiev

The New Yorker has a selection of excerpts from the “Memories” of Russian émigré writer Nadezhda Lokhvitskaya, who wrote under the name Teffi, detailing her time on the way to her Paris emigration in war-torn Ukraine. (Luckily, in our more civilized times, with the stability of the EU, Ukraine is…uh…oh…). Anyway, it’s titled “Stepping Across the Ice: Teffi (1872-1952)” and is translated from the Russian by Robert Chandler.

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Chandler and Anne-Marie Jackson translated a selection of Teffi’s stories for Pushkin Press in Subtly Worded (published in the UK in June and coming out in the US in December), while, according to The New Yorker, Robert and Elizabeth Chandler are currently translating Teffi’s Memories: From Moscow to the Black Sea for NYRB Classics.

Read a story by Teffi in B O D Y

Photo – Street scene in Odessa, 1917/wikimedia commons

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Categories: Literary Events, Magazines

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